Copyrighted Logo

css menu by Css3Menu.com


 

Bruce's 5th book, a Home Study Course, is now available.
Books & Tapes by Bruce Moen
    Bruce's Blog now at http://www.afterlife-knowledge.com/blog....

  HomeHelpSearchLoginRegister  
 
Pages: 1 2 
Send Topic Print
Digital Phantom Leaf Photography (Read 42279 times)
Pascuser
New Member
*
Offline


ALK Member

Posts: 9
Re: Digital Phantom Leaf Photography
Reply #15 - Jun 26th, 2012 at 11:59am
 
Thank you very much for your encouragements.

But YOU have invented this kind of analysis, and if I have been quick it's because you gave me all informations as a result of your long way work to find what to do to have what you have.

Thank YOU!

Here I give a link to download my Delphi software. I transformed it in something usable by anybody. There are 3 JPG files joined to work on it when downloaded.

The greatest thing to do would be to share you results here if you use the software with your own leaf pictures (or other pictures with phantom structures inside).

The software is destined only to Windows platforms (Windows 2000,Millenium, XP, 7, ...)

Link to download PhantomStructures version 1.01:
Phantom Structrures
Back to top
 
 
IP Logged
 
isee
Ex Member


Re: Digital Phantom Leaf Photography
Reply #16 - Jun 29th, 2012 at 8:59am
 
Very cool pictures, thanks for all the hard work; I can see the veins in the new pictures -- can you do a flower or other kind of plant?
Back to top
 
 
IP Logged
 
Pascuser
New Member
*
Offline


ALK Member

Posts: 9
Re: Digital Phantom Leaf Photography
Reply #17 - Jun 29th, 2012 at 12:41pm
 
I took new pictures with 2 new leafs.

Webcam, median picture from 10 pictures taken:
...

After using my software:
...

The background is perfectly uniform everywhere, all pixels have the exact same intensity. No structure at all.

Other leaf, numeric picture camera, other place at home:
...

After using software, there nothing visible at all; with many settings changed, only thermic noise and random noise:
...

I took a picture with the leaf, and an other one without the leaf, only background (same exposure time and focale) and I subtracted the two pictures. I then multiplied by a factor 10 the results to spread color palette. I got only noise too:
...

Conclusions: my pictures today all gave a null result. Last time they all allowed me to see a kind of vein structure.

But there is a big difference in the conditions for taking pictures: last time there was a blue sky with sun, and some white little clouds; but it was the blue sky that lighted my room (with indirect light sun, nit direct sun rays but sky luminosity). Today the weather quite different, there are very thick grey clouds all over the sky, not a piec of blue; we thought that It could rain all the day. The sky luminosity is quite uniform, white/grey coming from all the sky.

So, conditions may be (or not) important to have hudden structures; to have an interference pattern between the light and the leaf vital field. To know wether light conditions is important or not, I will do the same experiment another day with a blue sky and will tell you if I get structures back visible again; or not.

Today, one thing is sure: there is nothing, webcam or numeric picture camera, with background subtraction with a separated picture or study within one alone picture.

Maybe a new parameter is to be discovered to have such structures; more when next experiment will be conducted.
Back to top
 
 
IP Logged
 
betson
Super Member
*****
Offline


Afterlife Knowledge Member

Posts: 3445
SE USA
Gender: female
Re: Digital Phantom Leaf Photography
Reply #18 - Jun 29th, 2012 at 4:04pm
 
Hello,

thank you for sharing those.
Do you think the humidity/ air moisture in the room was different, due to weather conditions? 

Even indoors with the windows closed here at my home, a hygrometer shows that our humidity levels change with the outdoor weather.

I’m not saying that moisture is the only factor. Yet perhaps micro-moisture is necessary to carry the micro-energy charges that make up the leaf’s completed form --?

However that might infer that phantom leaf fill-ins would be difficult to do in a desert. Has anyone tried this in a desert environment?  Bruce had success in humid Florida, I assume.

Bets
Back to top
 

There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,
Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.
Shakespeare
 
IP Logged
 
Pascuser
New Member
*
Offline


ALK Member

Posts: 9
Re: Digital Phantom Leaf Photography
Reply #19 - Jun 29th, 2012 at 4:47pm
 
That's a very good idea. I didn't think in moisture.

Yes the air is very different since last time; "heavy" air. I don't have hygrometer so I can't say how much moisture there is but there is a lot I think.

What's more, the windows were opened this time to have a brighter light, so outside air was inside air too.
Last time it was a sunny and dry and "light" day, this time was a very clouddy and "heavy" air day.

Sorry for my bad english, I translate my french expressions in english, maybe this is not very clear in the english formulation.

Good idea, moisture. Maybe moisture attenuates the effect, because of air conductivity increase, so that electromagnetic variations interactions with leaf vital field are attenuated.

I think that Bruce did his experiments on clear sunny days, without any moisture. Am I wrong?
Back to top
 
 
IP Logged
 
Pascuser
New Member
*
Offline


ALK Member

Posts: 9
Re: Digital Phantom Leaf Photography
Reply #20 - Jul 2nd, 2012 at 4:08pm
 
I took a leaf from a tree at 19:30.
I could find a digital hygrometer: moisture was 41%.

Weather was sunny and sky blue with several small white clouds.

I modified the PhantomStructures software to allow a more clever use of the default (linear) palette to multiply intensities of pixels with adjustable coefficients. I will give the modified version of the software later.

I cut the leaf from the tree, 2 minutes later I cut a hole inside and 1 minute later I took 3 pictures of it.

Leaf not cut:
...

With the random palette method I got:
...


With the modification allowing me to multiply intensity variations without modifying the logic structure of the colors:
...

...

It looks like there is a vein that can be seen. I can see the same thing with the 3 different pictures, so we can't speak of a random noise that would produce this pseudo-vein.


More than 1hour and half after this I took another picture with a greater resolution. I can't see nothing now:
...

So what we can see dissapears after a long time; if it is vital force this seems logical.
Back to top
« Last Edit: Jul 14th, 2012 at 2:27pm by Bruce Moen »  
 
IP Logged
 
Bruce Moen
YaBB Administrator
*****
Offline



Posts: 587
YaBB Admin Land
Re: Digital Phantom Leaf Photography
Reply #21 - Jul 14th, 2012 at 12:30pm
 
Pascuser wrote on Jun 29th, 2012 at 4:47pm:
That's a very good idea. I didn't think in moisture.

Yes the air is very different since last time; "heavy" air. I don't have hygrometer so I can't say how much moisture there is but there is a lot I think.

What's more, the windows were opened this time to have a brighter light, so outside air was inside air too.
Last time it was a sunny and dry and "light" day, this time was a very clouddy and "heavy" air day.

Sorry for my bad english, I translate my french expressions in english, maybe this is not very clear in the english formulation.

Good idea, moisture. Maybe moisture attenuates the effect, because of air conductivity increase, so that electromagnetic variations interactions with leaf vital field are attenuated.

I think that Bruce did his experiments on clear sunny days, without any moisture. Am I wrong?


Pascuser,

I have been away for a while and busy with other things, primarily I have been watching the death of democracy in America, and its movement toward a "Kings and Peasants" country.  It is a terrible thing to watch.

I'm so happy to see such progress in your work, it's a breath of fresh air for the soul, and I find it fascinating.

I have adopted a basic philosophy I follow when researching the unknown. For as long as possible I attempt to delay coming to any concrete conclusions or explanations to account for what I observe from my experiments.  I attempt to see each new observation as evidence that might not be fully understood in the context of the specific, whole, unknown I'm researching.  In a sense I am only gathering pieces of an upside down jigsaw puzzle and trying see if any of them fit together.  And I try to always remember that when exploring this kind of unknown the experimenters' beliefs can have a very strong influence on the outcome.

Your observation that the air is" very different since last time; 'heavy' air" is one I find interesting.  It is evidence that moisture level in the leaf, and perhaps the air, or both, may be a factor in obtaining clear digital phantom leaf images.  Maybe it has something to do with the ability of the plant to sustain its phantom energy pattern? Maybe whatever the phantom energy pattern is affects water molecules in the air causing them to coalesce within that energy pattern? Maybe as these water molecules coalesce they form the optical equivalent of lens structures?  Maybe these lens structures bend, reflect, or refract light passing through them? Maybe that's why sunlight with its broad spectrum (especially its red, green and blue components) appears to yield better results than sunlight filtered through clouds into shades of gray?

With my philosophy of exploration I look at all those questions as "open questions."  Rather than reasons to form conclusions I see them as reasons to ask more questions, to look for more puzzle pieces.  As a pragmatic engineer I would be looking to run tests at at least three levels of humidity in the air and perhaps the leaf.  I be looking for more observations to determine if air humidity manipulation can be used to enhance digital family photographs.

I also wonder if the fact that direct sunlight is highly colminated, that is its waves are all very nearly parallel to each other, is some factor in getting better digital phantom leaf images. Since all these "light beams" are parallel to each other before passing through the missing leaf energy field maybe we are detecting the disruption in their parallelism. In essence sunbeams passing through vein structures may be bent causing a reduction in light intensity in that area and perhaps greater intensity and another area. These differences in intensity are what we are measuring, perhaps?

As a side note, in your software, is there a way that I can create my own lookup table, or color palette file? The random approach has its advantages, so to does a more structured approach. For example is there a way (Excel, text editor, or?) That I could create a palette with a repetitive pattern of colors? For example could I use the seven colors of the rainbow? For example, I could start with red representing some pixel intensity value, and continue progressively through increasing pixel intensity values to violet and then repeat that rainbow pattern over and over with increasing pixel intensity values. The reason I ask is . . .

The phantom leaf image below used to this sort of color palette. It was a leaf with a large portion of the tip cutaway photographed against a white background in direct, cloudless sunlight. Aside from the hint of a phantom leaf this image also clearly shows the variation of light intensity on the white background.  Near the center of the photograph this image was made from the light intensity had saturated much of the camera sensors' pixels.  It may be that taking the photograph close to saturation ( too bight a light level) has some positive effect on obtaining digital phantom leaf images.  Questions, more upside down puzzle pieces.

...


Keep up the great work, and to others, join in!

Bruce
Back to top
 
WWW  
IP Logged
 
PauliEffectt
Senior Member
****
Offline


ALK Member

Posts: 472
Gender: male
Re: Digital Phantom Leaf Photography
Reply #22 - Jul 15th, 2012 at 2:20pm
 
I wonder what's important here?

The image files themselves or the image manipulation software? Data or software?

If it's the files which are important, then the best files could perhaps be put somewhere,
and then people could download and try to use various software on those files?

If it's the software which is important, then that is a much harder problem to deal with.
In such a case the actual algorithm is important.

I am just wondering what's the path? Smiley
---

Reason is that with whatever best software used, it doesn't matter, if the image files
are the real important thing, and they at the same time are of worst quality, then
the best software will not be of much help.

If the software is important, and we can use any image files, then work has to be put into
algorithm design.

If there is no answer to what's important, then of course it doesn't matter how work
proceeds, because then it becomes more of a trial-and-error research thing.
Back to top
 
 
IP Logged
 
Bruce Moen
YaBB Administrator
*****
Offline



Posts: 587
YaBB Admin Land
Re: Digital Phantom Leaf Photography
Reply #23 - Jul 16th, 2012 at 12:14pm
 
PauliEffectt wrote on Jul 15th, 2012 at 2:20pm:
I wonder what's important here?

The image files themselves or the image manipulation software? Data or software?

If it's the files which are important, then the best files could perhaps be put somewhere,
and then people could download and try to use various software on those files?

If it's the software which is important, then that is a much harder problem to deal with.
In such a case the actual algorithm is important.

I am just wondering what's the path? Smiley
---


There are several factors that so far appear to be important to obtaining photographic evidence for the existence these nonphysical leaf structures.  In my view the image data capture (taking the picture) is most critical.  The evidence is either in the data or it is not.  I think the work shared here by Pascuser in his images clearly demonstrates that the evidence is in the image data at least at a "proof of concept" level.  By that I mean that even using simple web cam images there's enough evidence in the image data too at least warrant further, perhaps more sophisticated, experimentation.

Of importance on the image data file side . . .

1.  Minimize camera sensor random signal noise levels.  We are ultimately looking for very subtle differences in pixel intensity values.  They may be easily buried in high level sensor noise.

2. Image lighting.  Variations in random background light intensity can be thought of as a form of optical noise.  ( Note: To the extend that this noise is non-random it can be dealt with later with software.)

3.  The camera sensor itself.  Digital cameras use a "Bayer array" of tiny color filters (one per pixel) to split the image data into its red, green and blue (RGB) intensity components.  These RGB intensity values are used by standard image software to construct a color photograph from the data file.  For digital phantom leaf  photography it would be better to have the Bayer layer filters removed from the camera sensor.  Resulting intensity valves could then be analyzed more directly in software.

4.  It is probably desirable to use a camera that can output a RAW image date file.   Standard JPG files created by most cameras have altered the data to make the image file smaller.  This discards data and alters what data it outputs.  The phantom leaf structures are still evident in JPG format files, as my early work and Pascuser's work demonstrate, but RAW image data files contain more data that is closer to what the camera sensor actually recorded.  At present I am experimenting with a piece of software called "dcraw" (dee see raw) to get 16 bit per channel image data that is completely unaltered by my Cannon G2 Powershot in-camera and data conversion  (to TIF image format) software.

5.  Other factors such as humidity, lighting frequency content, lighting direction, colmination , time between leaf harvest and image capture, and other factors may also be important.

On the software side . . .

1.  If phantom leaf structures are in the data they must be made to be clearly visible over a range of many different photographs.   So far the best approach has been with pseudo coloring of minute differences in pixel intensity values using digital cameras.  Still, the choice of pseudo coloring schemes can make the structures of interest more visible or less visible.  To date only custom programmed software filters have been capable of making these structures visible.  It is not a task that standard software filters is designed to do.  Standard filters are designed to make pretty pictures rather than be used for scientific analyses.

Bruce
Back to top
 
WWW  
IP Logged
 
Scott M Stark
New Member
*
Offline


ALK Member

Posts: 1
Re: Digital Phantom Leaf Photography
Reply #24 - Apr 16th, 2013 at 8:25pm
 
Hello,

Is there a link to the ImageJ plugin that Bruce has been working on? I'm quite experienced with java and would be interested in seeing what I could contribute to the effort here.

Scott
Back to top
 
 
IP Logged
 
Bruce Moen
YaBB Administrator
*****
Offline



Posts: 587
YaBB Admin Land
Re: Digital Phantom Leaf Photography
Reply #25 - Apr 17th, 2013 at 10:33am
 
Scott,

There isn't an available ImageJ plugin.  I've working on a macro to process the image data, but it's a pretty clumsy approach.  A plugin would be a far better method.

Might you be interested in working together on a plugin for ImageJ?  It would be my intent to make such a plugin open source and free to anyone interested in experimenting with this digital phantom leaf technique.

Bruce
Back to top
 
WWW  
IP Logged
 
Kim
New Member
*
Offline


ALK Member

Posts: 1
Re: Digital Phantom Leaf Photography
Reply #26 - May 4th, 2013 at 4:26am
 
Hello!
I'm a student from Busan Science High School in Korea. My team have studied about Kirlian photography and Phantom leaf effect. We made the equipment of the kirlian photography at our school, and nowadays we are trying very hard to perform various experiments about the phantom leaf effect. When we were surfing the internet, I found this website and I really wanna contact with you to ask some questions. Could you teach us your email address please?
I'm  looking forward to receiving your answer. Thank you very much.
Sincerely, Kim
Back to top
 
 
IP Logged
 
Bruce Moen
YaBB Administrator
*****
Offline



Posts: 587
YaBB Admin Land
Re: Digital Phantom Leaf Photography
Reply #27 - May 4th, 2013 at 12:02pm
 
Kim,

I will be happy to communicate with you about Digital Phantom Leaf Photography.  My goal in developing this process is to give people a tool anyone can use to prove to themselves that realities beyond the physical exist.  So, I would ask that you treat this as an open source project.

I'll do my best to answer your questions and help you make this new form of photography work for you.  Do you have a schedule you must meet for your project?

It will be very helpful if you have someone on your team with the ability to write plugins for image editing software such as ImageJ (Java  language) or another image editor.

With that, how can I help you?  We can communicate with email and with Skype.  I live in Florida, USA, in the Eastern Time Zone.  I think Korea is 13 or 14 hours ahead of my time zone.

Bruce
Back to top
 
WWW  
IP Logged
 
Pages: 1 2 
Send Topic Print


This is a Peer Moderated Forum. You can report Posting Guideline violations.